Windows 7 trusted root certification authorities not updating

Posted by / 05-Mar-2021 11:40

Windows 7 trusted root certification authorities not updating

You might wonder why your self-signed certificate is not working properly in Edge and Internet Explorer while they work perfectly fine on other web browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer do not trust self-signed certificates by default for security reasons which is a good thing.Or they could possibly be applicable if I needed an encrypted connection to some server in, say, Tunisia or China.

But even if they were not, the sum total of these two groups would only be 74; a majority of the 343 certificates is still not visible.It probably does not matter so much whether one uses the authors tool to look at the certificates, or if one generates them to a separate list using the second method (the latter option provides more flexibility for working with the certificates however).Update 1: One of the answers says that a large amount of the 300-something missing certificates should be visible under the local machine account.However, trusting them in Edge or Internet Explorer is not so trivial.In this article, I will show you how to get your self-signed SSL certificate working on both Edge and IE11.

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This should display a larger amount of certificates but it's more difficult to see which ones are not trusted. Say that you for example read this Mozilla Blog about the e-Guven certificates and want to make sure it's set to untrusted in Windows. I had sort of assumed that the "go online" part of the Windows root certificate mechanism would only really kick in, if hadn't done your regular updates in a long, long while.

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